Joy Wiltenburg

Joy Wiltenburg received her Ph.D. in the social history of early modern Europe from the University of Virginia. She holds B.A. and M.A. degrees from the University of Rochester and has been a member of the Rowan history faculty since 1991.

Phone: 856 256-4819

Email: wiltenburg@rowan.edu

Office hours Spring 2011:

Tuesday 1:30-3:30, Thursday 1:30-2; other times by appointment.

Courses:

Spring 2011:

 



 

 

Teaching:

Dr. Wiltenburg teaches courses on European history from the Middle Ages through the Enlightenment. Courses offered regularly include Renaissance and Reformation, Age of Enlightenment, Women in Europe to 1700, and Women in Modern Europe. She also teaches more specialized courses such as Proseminar and Seminar, focusing on her field of specialty in the social and cultural history of early modern Europe.
 
 

Departmental and University Activities:

Dr. Wiltenburg became chair of the History Department in summer 2007. She has also served as the department's advising coordinator and on various university committees.

Publications:

Dr. Wiltenburg's article "True Crime: The History of Modern Sensationalism" appeared in the December 2004 issue of The American Historical Review. Her first book, Disorderly Women and Female Power in the Street Literature of Early Modern England and Germany, was published in 1992 by the University Press of Virginia. Women in Early Modern Germany: An Anthology of Popular Texts was published in 2003 by Medieval and Renaissance Texts and Studies (MRTS) of the University of Arizona. Dr. Wiltenburg's article "Culture and the Carolina: Revisiting the Imperial Penal Code of 1532" appeared in the fall 2000 issue of Renaissance Quarterly. Grants and fellowships from Rowan University, the National Endowment for the Humanities, and the American Council of Learned Societies have supported research on these and other publications and presentations.
 
 

Current Research:

Dr. Wiltenburg is currently completing a book project on the cultural history of crime in early modern Germany.